Dynamics of Repo and Reverse Repo Rates: A Financial Compass

Dynamics of Repo and Reverse Repo Rates: A Financial Compass

At Pluto Money, our mission is to illuminate the path through the dense forest of financial terminology, making the complex world of economics accessible and engaging. In this expanded exploration, we delve deeper into the intricate dance of repo and reverse repo rates, demystifying how these pivotal rates shape the financial landscape of India. By understanding the mechanics behind these tools employed by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), we can appreciate their profound impact not just on macroeconomic stability but also on the minutiae of our daily financial lives.

The Foundation: Repo and Reverse Repo Rates Explained

Repo rate, or 'Repurchase Option', is the cornerstone of RBI's monetary policy, acting as the rate at which commercial banks borrow money from the central bank against the pledge of government securities. This rate is a critical instrument for managing liquidity and controlling inflation within the economy. When banks face a shortfall in funds, they turn to the RBI, selling government securities with an agreement to repurchase them at a predetermined price, thereby securing the short-term funding they need to maintain their liquidity requirements.

Conversely, the reverse repo rate serves as the rate at which the RBI borrows money from commercial banks. This mechanism is employed to absorb excess liquidity from the banking system, thereby preventing the overheating of the economy and keeping inflation in check. When there's surplus liquidity, banks park their funds with the RBI, earning interest on these deposits, which is determined by the reverse repo rate.

The Macro and Micro Impact: Beyond Interest Rates

The interplay between the repo and reverse repo rates goes beyond mere numbers; it's about steering the economy towards a balance between growth and inflation. High repo rates make borrowing expensive for banks, which in turn slows down investment and spending, cooling down inflation. On the flip side, lower repo rates encourage borrowing and investment, spurring economic activity but with the risk of increasing inflation.

On a micro level, these rates directly influence the interest rates you see on loans and deposits. A hike in the repo rate could mean higher EMIs for your loans, while a cut could make those loans cheaper. Similarly, changes in the reverse repo rate can affect the returns on your deposits, making them more or less attractive based on the economic conditions dictated by the RBI's policies.

The Strategy Behind Rate Adjustments

The RBI's adjustments to repo and reverse repo rates are finely calibrated moves aimed at either stimulating the economy or reining in inflation, depending on the prevailing economic conditions. By manipulating these rates, the RBI sends signals to the markets, influencing lending rates, consumer spending, and overall economic activity. For instance, during economic downturns, the RBI might lower the repo rate to make borrowing cheaper, encouraging banks to lend more and thus stimulate economic growth.

Navigating Financial Decisions: A Guide for Individuals and Businesses

Understanding the ebb and flow of repo and reverse repo rates can serve as a compass for navigating financial decisions. For individuals, this knowledge can inform decisions about when to take out loans, refinance existing ones, or invest in fixed deposits. For businesses, insights into rate trends can guide strategies around borrowing for expansion, managing operational cash flow, or investing surplus funds.

  • For Individuals: Keep an eye on RBI announcements regarding rate changes. A lowering of the repo rate might be the opportune time to lock in a lower interest rate on a new home loan or consider refinancing your existing loan.

  • For Businesses: Align your borrowing and investment strategies with the current monetary policy stance. In a low repo rate regime, it might be advantageous to explore financing options for expansion or capital expenditure.

Empowerment Through Financial Literacy

At Pluto Money, we believe in the power of financial literacy to transform lives. By demystifying the functions and impacts of repo and reverse repo rates, we aim to empower you with the knowledge to make informed financial decisions. Understanding these fundamental economic tools allows individuals and businesses alike to navigate the financial landscape with confidence, turning challenges into opportunities for growth and stability.

Through this detailed exploration, we've spanned the breadth and depth of repo and reverse repo rates, revealing their critical role in shaping India's economic narrative. Armed with this knowledge, you're now better equipped to understand the financial news, anticipate market movements, and plan your financial future with greater insight and foresight.

Understanding Repo Rate: The Cost of Borrowing for Banks

Imagine a scenario where banks, much like individuals, need to borrow money to ensure they have enough liquidity to meet their daily operations or statutory requirements. This is where the repo rate comes into play. It's the rate at which the RBI lends money to commercial banks against securities, ensuring a flow of funds in the banking system.

The Mechanics Behind Repo Rate

  • Repo Rate Full Form: Standing for 'Repurchase Agreement' or 'Repurchasing Option,' it encapsulates an agreement where banks sell securities to the RBI with a promise to repurchase them at a future date at a predetermined price.

  • Impact on Inflation: The RBI strategically manipulates the repo rate to control inflation. By adjusting the cost of borrowing for banks, the RBI can influence the economy's overall liquidity and spending power, making it a potent tool against inflationary pressures.

The Flip Side: Reverse Repo Rate Explained

While the repo rate addresses the scenario of banks borrowing from the RBI, the reverse repo rate covers the opposite situation—when the RBI borrows money from banks. This rate is pivotal during periods of excess liquidity in the market, acting as a mechanism to absorb the surplus, thereby preventing inflationary tendencies by restricting the banks' ability to lend excessively.

The Strategic Use of Reverse Repo Rate

  • Inflation Control: By increasing the reverse repo rate, the RBI makes it more lucrative for banks to park their excess funds with the central bank, effectively reducing the money available for lending to the public and businesses.

  • Economic Balancing Act: The reverse repo rate is a critical tool in the RBI's arsenal for managing the delicate balance of economic growth and inflation, ensuring neither spirals out of control.

The Ripple Effect: How Repo and Reverse Repo Rates Influence the Economy

The interplay between the repo and reverse repo rates is a dance of economic forces, guiding the flow of money through the banking system and into the broader economy. Their adjustment can lead to significant outcomes:

  • Inflation and Growth: A high repo rate can curb inflation but may also slow down economic growth, while a low rate can spur growth but risk inflation.

  • Loan Interest Rates: Changes in the repo rate can directly impact the interest rates on loans and mortgages, affecting everything from consumer spending to business investment.

Current Scenario and Its Implications

The RBI's adjustments to the repo and reverse repo rates are responsive to the prevailing economic conditions, aiming to foster a stable financial environment conducive to growth. A decrease in these rates seeks to encourage borrowing and spending, a move particularly relevant in times of economic downturns to stimulate recovery.

The Balancing Act of Monetary Policy

The repo and reverse repo rates are more than just figures; they are reflections of the RBI's monetary policy stance, aimed at steering the Indian economy towards stability and growth. By understanding these rates, we gain insight into the broader economic strategies at play, affecting everything from market dynamics to our personal financial planning.

In this intricate dance of monetary control, the RBI's careful adjustments to the repo and reverse repo rates ensure that the economy remains on a path of sustainable growth, carefully navigating through the challenges of inflation and liquidity.

The Direct Line: From RBI to Your Wallet

The adjustments in repo and reverse repo rates by the RBI are not just macroeconomic levers—they have a direct influence on the common man's financial well-being, affecting loan interest rates, savings, and investment returns. Understanding this connection can empower individuals to make more informed financial choices in response to changing economic policies.

Repo Rate and Its Influence on Loans

  • Borrowing Costs: An increase in the repo rate makes borrowing more expensive for banks, a cost that's often passed on to consumers in the form of higher interest rates on loans, including home, car, and personal loans. Conversely, a reduction in the repo rate can lead to lower borrowing costs, potentially making it a favorable time for taking out new loans or refinancing existing ones.

  • EMI Adjustments: For those with existing loans, especially variable or floating rate loans, changes in the repo rate can directly impact monthly repayment amounts (EMIs), affecting household budgets and financial planning.

Reverse Repo Rate: The Savings Equation

  • Savings Rate: While the reverse repo rate's direct impact on consumers might seem less apparent than the repo rate, it influences the interest rates banks offer on deposits. A higher reverse repo rate can encourage banks to offer higher interest rates on savings and fixed deposits, making saving more attractive than spending or investing in riskier assets.

The Banking Industry's Balancing Act

Banks and financial institutions find themselves at the intersection of RBI's monetary policy and consumer expectations, navigating a tightrope of balancing their lending and deposit rates to maintain profitability while remaining competitive and attractive to customers.

  • Liquidity Management: Banks must adeptly manage their liquidity to meet the RBI's cash reserve requirements while also ensuring enough funds to meet deposit withdrawal demands and lend to borrowers. Changes in the repo and reverse repo rates directly impact this delicate balancing act.

  • Credit Supply and Economic Growth: By adjusting lending rates in response to RBI's policy changes, banks play a crucial role in either stimulating economic growth through increased lending or cooling down an overheating economy by tightening the credit supply.

Navigating Financial Decisions in a Changing Economic Landscape

As individuals, our financial decisions—be it investing, borrowing, or saving—should be made with an understanding of the broader economic environment and its likely trajectory. Here's how you can navigate these decisions:

  • Stay Informed: Keep abreast of changes in RBI's repo and reverse repo rates as they can provide valuable signals about the economic outlook and potential rate changes for loans and deposits.

  • Financial Planning: Factor in potential rate changes when planning major financial decisions or commitments, such as taking out a mortgage or locking in a fixed deposit rate.

Strategic Financial Planning Amidst Rate Fluctuations

The dynamic nature of repo and reverse repo rates, as tools in the RBI's monetary policy arsenal, means that individuals and businesses alike must remain agile and informed to adapt their financial strategies accordingly. Here’s how you can align your financial planning with these economic indicators:

For Individuals: Maximizing Financial Health

  • Loan Management: If you're considering a loan or already have one, understanding the impact of repo rate changes can help you choose between fixed and variable rate options or decide the best time to refinance.

  • Savings and Investment: Align your investment strategies with the prevailing economic cycle influenced by the reverse repo rate. In times of high reverse repo rates, it might be advantageous to look into higher interest rate savings accounts or fixed deposits as secure investment options.

  • Budgeting and Emergency Planning: Adjust your budget to account for potential changes in loan EMIs or savings interest earnings, ensuring you have an emergency fund that can withstand economic fluctuations.

For Businesses: Ensuring Sustainable Growth

  • Capital Expenditure and Expansion: Businesses should carefully plan their expansion and capital expenditure based on the current repo rate, as borrowing costs can significantly impact project viability.

  • Working Capital Management: With changes in the repo rate affecting short-term borrowing costs, businesses need to adeptly manage their working capital and liquidity to ensure operational efficiency.

Navigating Through Economic Signals

Understanding the repo and reverse repo rates and their implications allows individuals and businesses to interpret the RBI's economic signals and adjust their financial strategies accordingly. Here’s how you can stay ahead:

  • Stay Updated: Regularly follow updates from the RBI and financial news to stay informed about rate changes and their potential implications.

  • Seek Professional Advice: Consider consulting with financial advisors to understand the broader economic trends and tailor your financial planning to your specific needs and goals.

  • Adaptive Financial Planning: Develop a flexible financial plan that can adapt to rate changes, allowing you to take advantage of favorable conditions and mitigate potential risks.

The Ripple Effect: Beyond Individual and Business Finance

The repo and reverse repo rates extend their influence beyond individual and business finance, affecting the broader economy's health, inflation rates, and growth trajectories. As citizens and participants in the economy, understanding these concepts helps us grasp the broader economic narrative and its impact on our daily lives and financial decisions.

Conclusion: Empowerment Through Understanding

The journey through the intricacies of repo and reverse repo rates underscores the importance of financial literacy in empowering individuals and businesses to navigate the complexities of economic policies and market conditions. By demystifying these concepts, Pluto Money aims to provide you with the tools and knowledge to make informed financial decisions, ensuring resilience and prosperity in an ever-changing economic landscape.

At Pluto Money, our mission is to illuminate the path through the dense forest of financial terminology, making the complex world of economics accessible and engaging. In this expanded exploration, we delve deeper into the intricate dance of repo and reverse repo rates, demystifying how these pivotal rates shape the financial landscape of India. By understanding the mechanics behind these tools employed by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), we can appreciate their profound impact not just on macroeconomic stability but also on the minutiae of our daily financial lives.

The Foundation: Repo and Reverse Repo Rates Explained

Repo rate, or 'Repurchase Option', is the cornerstone of RBI's monetary policy, acting as the rate at which commercial banks borrow money from the central bank against the pledge of government securities. This rate is a critical instrument for managing liquidity and controlling inflation within the economy. When banks face a shortfall in funds, they turn to the RBI, selling government securities with an agreement to repurchase them at a predetermined price, thereby securing the short-term funding they need to maintain their liquidity requirements.

Conversely, the reverse repo rate serves as the rate at which the RBI borrows money from commercial banks. This mechanism is employed to absorb excess liquidity from the banking system, thereby preventing the overheating of the economy and keeping inflation in check. When there's surplus liquidity, banks park their funds with the RBI, earning interest on these deposits, which is determined by the reverse repo rate.

The Macro and Micro Impact: Beyond Interest Rates

The interplay between the repo and reverse repo rates goes beyond mere numbers; it's about steering the economy towards a balance between growth and inflation. High repo rates make borrowing expensive for banks, which in turn slows down investment and spending, cooling down inflation. On the flip side, lower repo rates encourage borrowing and investment, spurring economic activity but with the risk of increasing inflation.

On a micro level, these rates directly influence the interest rates you see on loans and deposits. A hike in the repo rate could mean higher EMIs for your loans, while a cut could make those loans cheaper. Similarly, changes in the reverse repo rate can affect the returns on your deposits, making them more or less attractive based on the economic conditions dictated by the RBI's policies.

The Strategy Behind Rate Adjustments

The RBI's adjustments to repo and reverse repo rates are finely calibrated moves aimed at either stimulating the economy or reining in inflation, depending on the prevailing economic conditions. By manipulating these rates, the RBI sends signals to the markets, influencing lending rates, consumer spending, and overall economic activity. For instance, during economic downturns, the RBI might lower the repo rate to make borrowing cheaper, encouraging banks to lend more and thus stimulate economic growth.

Navigating Financial Decisions: A Guide for Individuals and Businesses

Understanding the ebb and flow of repo and reverse repo rates can serve as a compass for navigating financial decisions. For individuals, this knowledge can inform decisions about when to take out loans, refinance existing ones, or invest in fixed deposits. For businesses, insights into rate trends can guide strategies around borrowing for expansion, managing operational cash flow, or investing surplus funds.

  • For Individuals: Keep an eye on RBI announcements regarding rate changes. A lowering of the repo rate might be the opportune time to lock in a lower interest rate on a new home loan or consider refinancing your existing loan.

  • For Businesses: Align your borrowing and investment strategies with the current monetary policy stance. In a low repo rate regime, it might be advantageous to explore financing options for expansion or capital expenditure.

Empowerment Through Financial Literacy

At Pluto Money, we believe in the power of financial literacy to transform lives. By demystifying the functions and impacts of repo and reverse repo rates, we aim to empower you with the knowledge to make informed financial decisions. Understanding these fundamental economic tools allows individuals and businesses alike to navigate the financial landscape with confidence, turning challenges into opportunities for growth and stability.

Through this detailed exploration, we've spanned the breadth and depth of repo and reverse repo rates, revealing their critical role in shaping India's economic narrative. Armed with this knowledge, you're now better equipped to understand the financial news, anticipate market movements, and plan your financial future with greater insight and foresight.

Understanding Repo Rate: The Cost of Borrowing for Banks

Imagine a scenario where banks, much like individuals, need to borrow money to ensure they have enough liquidity to meet their daily operations or statutory requirements. This is where the repo rate comes into play. It's the rate at which the RBI lends money to commercial banks against securities, ensuring a flow of funds in the banking system.

The Mechanics Behind Repo Rate

  • Repo Rate Full Form: Standing for 'Repurchase Agreement' or 'Repurchasing Option,' it encapsulates an agreement where banks sell securities to the RBI with a promise to repurchase them at a future date at a predetermined price.

  • Impact on Inflation: The RBI strategically manipulates the repo rate to control inflation. By adjusting the cost of borrowing for banks, the RBI can influence the economy's overall liquidity and spending power, making it a potent tool against inflationary pressures.

The Flip Side: Reverse Repo Rate Explained

While the repo rate addresses the scenario of banks borrowing from the RBI, the reverse repo rate covers the opposite situation—when the RBI borrows money from banks. This rate is pivotal during periods of excess liquidity in the market, acting as a mechanism to absorb the surplus, thereby preventing inflationary tendencies by restricting the banks' ability to lend excessively.

The Strategic Use of Reverse Repo Rate

  • Inflation Control: By increasing the reverse repo rate, the RBI makes it more lucrative for banks to park their excess funds with the central bank, effectively reducing the money available for lending to the public and businesses.

  • Economic Balancing Act: The reverse repo rate is a critical tool in the RBI's arsenal for managing the delicate balance of economic growth and inflation, ensuring neither spirals out of control.

The Ripple Effect: How Repo and Reverse Repo Rates Influence the Economy

The interplay between the repo and reverse repo rates is a dance of economic forces, guiding the flow of money through the banking system and into the broader economy. Their adjustment can lead to significant outcomes:

  • Inflation and Growth: A high repo rate can curb inflation but may also slow down economic growth, while a low rate can spur growth but risk inflation.

  • Loan Interest Rates: Changes in the repo rate can directly impact the interest rates on loans and mortgages, affecting everything from consumer spending to business investment.

Current Scenario and Its Implications

The RBI's adjustments to the repo and reverse repo rates are responsive to the prevailing economic conditions, aiming to foster a stable financial environment conducive to growth. A decrease in these rates seeks to encourage borrowing and spending, a move particularly relevant in times of economic downturns to stimulate recovery.

The Balancing Act of Monetary Policy

The repo and reverse repo rates are more than just figures; they are reflections of the RBI's monetary policy stance, aimed at steering the Indian economy towards stability and growth. By understanding these rates, we gain insight into the broader economic strategies at play, affecting everything from market dynamics to our personal financial planning.

In this intricate dance of monetary control, the RBI's careful adjustments to the repo and reverse repo rates ensure that the economy remains on a path of sustainable growth, carefully navigating through the challenges of inflation and liquidity.

The Direct Line: From RBI to Your Wallet

The adjustments in repo and reverse repo rates by the RBI are not just macroeconomic levers—they have a direct influence on the common man's financial well-being, affecting loan interest rates, savings, and investment returns. Understanding this connection can empower individuals to make more informed financial choices in response to changing economic policies.

Repo Rate and Its Influence on Loans

  • Borrowing Costs: An increase in the repo rate makes borrowing more expensive for banks, a cost that's often passed on to consumers in the form of higher interest rates on loans, including home, car, and personal loans. Conversely, a reduction in the repo rate can lead to lower borrowing costs, potentially making it a favorable time for taking out new loans or refinancing existing ones.

  • EMI Adjustments: For those with existing loans, especially variable or floating rate loans, changes in the repo rate can directly impact monthly repayment amounts (EMIs), affecting household budgets and financial planning.

Reverse Repo Rate: The Savings Equation

  • Savings Rate: While the reverse repo rate's direct impact on consumers might seem less apparent than the repo rate, it influences the interest rates banks offer on deposits. A higher reverse repo rate can encourage banks to offer higher interest rates on savings and fixed deposits, making saving more attractive than spending or investing in riskier assets.

The Banking Industry's Balancing Act

Banks and financial institutions find themselves at the intersection of RBI's monetary policy and consumer expectations, navigating a tightrope of balancing their lending and deposit rates to maintain profitability while remaining competitive and attractive to customers.

  • Liquidity Management: Banks must adeptly manage their liquidity to meet the RBI's cash reserve requirements while also ensuring enough funds to meet deposit withdrawal demands and lend to borrowers. Changes in the repo and reverse repo rates directly impact this delicate balancing act.

  • Credit Supply and Economic Growth: By adjusting lending rates in response to RBI's policy changes, banks play a crucial role in either stimulating economic growth through increased lending or cooling down an overheating economy by tightening the credit supply.

Navigating Financial Decisions in a Changing Economic Landscape

As individuals, our financial decisions—be it investing, borrowing, or saving—should be made with an understanding of the broader economic environment and its likely trajectory. Here's how you can navigate these decisions:

  • Stay Informed: Keep abreast of changes in RBI's repo and reverse repo rates as they can provide valuable signals about the economic outlook and potential rate changes for loans and deposits.

  • Financial Planning: Factor in potential rate changes when planning major financial decisions or commitments, such as taking out a mortgage or locking in a fixed deposit rate.

Strategic Financial Planning Amidst Rate Fluctuations

The dynamic nature of repo and reverse repo rates, as tools in the RBI's monetary policy arsenal, means that individuals and businesses alike must remain agile and informed to adapt their financial strategies accordingly. Here’s how you can align your financial planning with these economic indicators:

For Individuals: Maximizing Financial Health

  • Loan Management: If you're considering a loan or already have one, understanding the impact of repo rate changes can help you choose between fixed and variable rate options or decide the best time to refinance.

  • Savings and Investment: Align your investment strategies with the prevailing economic cycle influenced by the reverse repo rate. In times of high reverse repo rates, it might be advantageous to look into higher interest rate savings accounts or fixed deposits as secure investment options.

  • Budgeting and Emergency Planning: Adjust your budget to account for potential changes in loan EMIs or savings interest earnings, ensuring you have an emergency fund that can withstand economic fluctuations.

For Businesses: Ensuring Sustainable Growth

  • Capital Expenditure and Expansion: Businesses should carefully plan their expansion and capital expenditure based on the current repo rate, as borrowing costs can significantly impact project viability.

  • Working Capital Management: With changes in the repo rate affecting short-term borrowing costs, businesses need to adeptly manage their working capital and liquidity to ensure operational efficiency.

Navigating Through Economic Signals

Understanding the repo and reverse repo rates and their implications allows individuals and businesses to interpret the RBI's economic signals and adjust their financial strategies accordingly. Here’s how you can stay ahead:

  • Stay Updated: Regularly follow updates from the RBI and financial news to stay informed about rate changes and their potential implications.

  • Seek Professional Advice: Consider consulting with financial advisors to understand the broader economic trends and tailor your financial planning to your specific needs and goals.

  • Adaptive Financial Planning: Develop a flexible financial plan that can adapt to rate changes, allowing you to take advantage of favorable conditions and mitigate potential risks.

The Ripple Effect: Beyond Individual and Business Finance

The repo and reverse repo rates extend their influence beyond individual and business finance, affecting the broader economy's health, inflation rates, and growth trajectories. As citizens and participants in the economy, understanding these concepts helps us grasp the broader economic narrative and its impact on our daily lives and financial decisions.

Conclusion: Empowerment Through Understanding

The journey through the intricacies of repo and reverse repo rates underscores the importance of financial literacy in empowering individuals and businesses to navigate the complexities of economic policies and market conditions. By demystifying these concepts, Pluto Money aims to provide you with the tools and knowledge to make informed financial decisions, ensuring resilience and prosperity in an ever-changing economic landscape.

FAQs 🤔

1. What is the repo rate?

The repo rate is the rate at which commercial banks borrow money from the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) by selling their securities, to maintain liquidity. It's a primary monetary policy tool used by the RBI to control inflation and stimulate the economy.

2. How does the reverse repo rate work?

The reverse repo rate is the rate at which the RBI borrows money from commercial banks. It's used to absorb excess liquidity in the market, which helps in controlling inflation and managing the money supply.

3. How do repo and reverse repo rates affect common people?

Changes in the repo and reverse repo rates influence the interest rates on loans and savings. A higher repo rate can make loans more expensive and savings more lucrative, while a lower rate can make borrowing cheaper.

4. Why does the RBI adjust repo and reverse repo rates?

The RBI adjusts these rates to manage the country's economic growth and inflation. Lowering the rates can stimulate economic growth by making borrowing cheaper while raising them can help control inflation by making borrowing more expensive.

5. Can changes in the repo rate impact EMIs on loans?

Yes, changes in the repo rate can affect the Equated Monthly Installments (EMIs) on variable or floating-rate loans. A decrease in the repo rate can lead to lower EMIs, making loans more affordable for borrowers.

1. What is the repo rate?

The repo rate is the rate at which commercial banks borrow money from the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) by selling their securities, to maintain liquidity. It's a primary monetary policy tool used by the RBI to control inflation and stimulate the economy.

2. How does the reverse repo rate work?

The reverse repo rate is the rate at which the RBI borrows money from commercial banks. It's used to absorb excess liquidity in the market, which helps in controlling inflation and managing the money supply.

3. How do repo and reverse repo rates affect common people?

Changes in the repo and reverse repo rates influence the interest rates on loans and savings. A higher repo rate can make loans more expensive and savings more lucrative, while a lower rate can make borrowing cheaper.

4. Why does the RBI adjust repo and reverse repo rates?

The RBI adjusts these rates to manage the country's economic growth and inflation. Lowering the rates can stimulate economic growth by making borrowing cheaper while raising them can help control inflation by making borrowing more expensive.

5. Can changes in the repo rate impact EMIs on loans?

Yes, changes in the repo rate can affect the Equated Monthly Installments (EMIs) on variable or floating-rate loans. A decrease in the repo rate can lead to lower EMIs, making loans more affordable for borrowers.

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