central government holidays 2024

central government holidays 2024

Understanding India's Public Holidays in 2024

India, with its diverse cultural and religious landscape, recognizes a multitude of public holidays throughout the year. These holidays, also known as government holidays, encompass religious, cultural, and nationalistic significance, and are regulated by both union and state laws. The list of central government holidays for 2024 is a testament to the country's rich heritage and traditions.

Exploring Gazetted Holidays

Gazetted holidays hold official recognition by the government and are observed nationwide by public institutions. The gazetted holidays for 2024 are as follows:

  • Republic Day: Celebrated on January 26th, marking the adoption of the Indian Constitution.

  • Holi: The festival of colors, celebrated on March 25th.

  • Good Friday: Observed on March 29th, commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

  • Eid-ul-Fitr: Celebrated on April 9th and 10th, marking the end of Ramadan.

  • Ram Navami: Commemorating the birth of Lord Rama, observed on April 17th.

  • Mahavir Jayanti: Celebrated on April 21st, marking the birth anniversary of Lord Mahavir.

  • Buddha Purnima: Observed on May 23rd, commemorating the birth, enlightenment, and death of Gautama Buddha.

  • Independence Day: Celebrated on August 15th, marking India's independence from British rule.

  • Janmashtami: Commemorating the birth of Lord Krishna, observed on August 26th.

  • Gandhi Jayanti: Celebrated on October 2nd, marking the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi.

  • Diwali: The festival of lights, celebrated on October 31st.

  • Christmas: Observed on December 25th, commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ.

Unveiling Restricted Holidays

In addition to gazetted holidays, India also observes restricted or optional holidays, providing individuals with the flexibility to commemorate events of personal or cultural significance. The list of restricted holidays for 2024 includes:

  • New Year's Day: Celebrated on January 1st, marking the beginning of the Gregorian calendar.

  • Lohri: Observed on January 13th, marking the winter solstice.

  • Makar Sankranti: Celebrated on January 14th, marking the transition of the sun into the Capricorn zodiac.

  • Guru Gobind Singh’s Birthday: Commemorated on January 17th, honoring the birth of the tenth Sikh Guru.

  • Hazarat Ali’s Birthday: Observed on January 25th, commemorating the birth of Hazrat Ali, a key figure in Islam.

Unraveling Restricted Holidays (Continued)

The list of restricted holidays for 2024 continues to showcase India's cultural diversity and rich tapestry of traditions:

  • Sri Panchami, Basant Panchami: Celebrated on February 14th, marking the arrival of spring.

  • Shivaji Jayanti: Observed on February 19th, commemorating the birth anniversary of Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj.

  • Guru Ravi Das’s Birthday: Honoring the birth of the revered saint, observed on February 24th.

  • Birthday of Swami Dayananda Saraswati: Celebrated on March 6th, marking the birth anniversary of the founder of Arya Samaj.

  • Maha Shivratri: Observed on March 8th, honoring Lord Shiva.

  • Holika Dahan: Celebrated on March 24th, symbolizing the victory of good over evil.

  • Dolyatra: Observed on March 25th, marking the Hindu festival of colors.

  • Easter Sunday: Commemorated on March 31st, marking the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

  • Jamat-Ul-Vida: Observed on April 5th, marking the last Friday of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

  • Chaitra Sukladi / Gudi Padava/Ugadi/ Cheti Chand: Celebrated on April 9th, marking the beginning of the Hindu lunar calendar.

  • Vaisakhi / Vishu: Observed on April 13th, marking the harvest festival in Punjab and the New Year festival in Kerala.

  • Meshadi (Tamil New Year’s Day) / Vaisakhadi (Bengal) / Bahag Bihu (Assam): Celebrated on April 14th, marking the New Year in various regions of India.

Continuing the Celebration

India's calendar is filled with festivities throughout the year, with each holiday offering a unique opportunity for celebration and reflection. The remaining restricted holidays for 2024 include:

  • Birthday of Guru Rabindranath Tagore: Celebrated on May 8th, honoring the birth anniversary of the Nobel laureate.

  • Rath Yatra: Observed on July 7th, marking the chariot procession of Lord Jagannath.

  • Parsi New Year’s Day/Nauraj: Celebrated on August 15th, marking the New Year in the Parsi community.

  • Raksha Bandhan: Observed on August 19th, celebrating the bond between brothers and sisters.

  • Ganesh Chaturthi / Vinayaka Chaturthi: Celebrated on September 7th, honoring the birth of Lord Ganesha.

  • Onam or Thiru Onam Day: Observed on September 15th, marking the harvest festival in Kerala.

  • Dusshera (Saptami): Celebrated on October 10th, marking the victory of Lord Rama over Ravana.

  • Dussehra (Mahashtami) / Dussehra (Mahanavmi): Observed on October 11th, culminating in the victory of good over evil.

  • Maharishi Valmiki’s Birthday: Celebrated on October 17th, honoring the birth anniversary of the author of the epic Ramayana.

  • Karaka Chaturthi (Karwa Chouth): Observed on October 20th, celebrating the bond between husband and wife.

  • Naraka Chaturdasi: Celebrated on October 31st, marking the victory of Lord Krishna over the demon Narakasura.

Embracing Diversity and Tradition

India's public holidays for 2024 reflect the nation's vibrant tapestry of cultures, religions, and traditions. As we continue our exploration, let's delve into the significance of the remaining restricted holidays:

  • Govardhan Puja: Celebrated on November 2nd, honoring Lord Krishna's triumph over Lord Indra.

  • Bhai Duj: Observed on November 3rd, celebrating the bond between brothers and sisters.

  • Pratihar Shashthi or Surya Shashthi (Chhat Puja): Celebrated on November 7th, dedicated to worshipping the sun god and seeking blessings for the well-being of family members.

  • Guru Teg Bahadur’s Martyrdom Day: Commemorated on November 24th, honoring the sacrifice of Guru Teg Bahadur, the ninth Sikh Guru.

  • Christmas Eve: Observed on December 24th, marking the eve of the birth of Jesus Christ.

Reflecting on the Significance

Each of these holidays holds profound cultural, religious, or historical significance for the people of India. They serve as occasions for reflection, celebration, and communal bonding, reinforcing the country's rich heritage and values.

Planning Ahead

As we look forward to the upcoming year, it's essential to plan ahead and make the most of these holidays. Whether it's spending time with family, participating in religious rituals, or engaging in cultural festivities, these occasions offer opportunities to reconnect with our roots and strengthen the bonds of community.

Conclusion: Celebrating Unity in Diversity

India's public holidays for 2024 exemplify the nation's ethos of unity in diversity. From Republic Day to Christmas Eve, each holiday symbolizes a unique aspect of India's cultural heritage and collective identity.

As we navigate the year ahead, let us embrace the spirit of inclusivity and celebration that defines India's public holidays. May these occasions serve as reminders of our shared values, aspirations, and aspirations as we continue to strive towards a brighter, more harmonious future.

Thank you for joining us on this journey through India's public holidays for 2024. We hope you found this exploration enriching and insightful. Wishing you a year filled with joy, prosperity, and meaningful connections as we celebrate the diversity of our nation's cultural tapestry.

Understanding India's Public Holidays in 2024

India, with its diverse cultural and religious landscape, recognizes a multitude of public holidays throughout the year. These holidays, also known as government holidays, encompass religious, cultural, and nationalistic significance, and are regulated by both union and state laws. The list of central government holidays for 2024 is a testament to the country's rich heritage and traditions.

Exploring Gazetted Holidays

Gazetted holidays hold official recognition by the government and are observed nationwide by public institutions. The gazetted holidays for 2024 are as follows:

  • Republic Day: Celebrated on January 26th, marking the adoption of the Indian Constitution.

  • Holi: The festival of colors, celebrated on March 25th.

  • Good Friday: Observed on March 29th, commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

  • Eid-ul-Fitr: Celebrated on April 9th and 10th, marking the end of Ramadan.

  • Ram Navami: Commemorating the birth of Lord Rama, observed on April 17th.

  • Mahavir Jayanti: Celebrated on April 21st, marking the birth anniversary of Lord Mahavir.

  • Buddha Purnima: Observed on May 23rd, commemorating the birth, enlightenment, and death of Gautama Buddha.

  • Independence Day: Celebrated on August 15th, marking India's independence from British rule.

  • Janmashtami: Commemorating the birth of Lord Krishna, observed on August 26th.

  • Gandhi Jayanti: Celebrated on October 2nd, marking the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi.

  • Diwali: The festival of lights, celebrated on October 31st.

  • Christmas: Observed on December 25th, commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ.

Unveiling Restricted Holidays

In addition to gazetted holidays, India also observes restricted or optional holidays, providing individuals with the flexibility to commemorate events of personal or cultural significance. The list of restricted holidays for 2024 includes:

  • New Year's Day: Celebrated on January 1st, marking the beginning of the Gregorian calendar.

  • Lohri: Observed on January 13th, marking the winter solstice.

  • Makar Sankranti: Celebrated on January 14th, marking the transition of the sun into the Capricorn zodiac.

  • Guru Gobind Singh’s Birthday: Commemorated on January 17th, honoring the birth of the tenth Sikh Guru.

  • Hazarat Ali’s Birthday: Observed on January 25th, commemorating the birth of Hazrat Ali, a key figure in Islam.

Unraveling Restricted Holidays (Continued)

The list of restricted holidays for 2024 continues to showcase India's cultural diversity and rich tapestry of traditions:

  • Sri Panchami, Basant Panchami: Celebrated on February 14th, marking the arrival of spring.

  • Shivaji Jayanti: Observed on February 19th, commemorating the birth anniversary of Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj.

  • Guru Ravi Das’s Birthday: Honoring the birth of the revered saint, observed on February 24th.

  • Birthday of Swami Dayananda Saraswati: Celebrated on March 6th, marking the birth anniversary of the founder of Arya Samaj.

  • Maha Shivratri: Observed on March 8th, honoring Lord Shiva.

  • Holika Dahan: Celebrated on March 24th, symbolizing the victory of good over evil.

  • Dolyatra: Observed on March 25th, marking the Hindu festival of colors.

  • Easter Sunday: Commemorated on March 31st, marking the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

  • Jamat-Ul-Vida: Observed on April 5th, marking the last Friday of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

  • Chaitra Sukladi / Gudi Padava/Ugadi/ Cheti Chand: Celebrated on April 9th, marking the beginning of the Hindu lunar calendar.

  • Vaisakhi / Vishu: Observed on April 13th, marking the harvest festival in Punjab and the New Year festival in Kerala.

  • Meshadi (Tamil New Year’s Day) / Vaisakhadi (Bengal) / Bahag Bihu (Assam): Celebrated on April 14th, marking the New Year in various regions of India.

Continuing the Celebration

India's calendar is filled with festivities throughout the year, with each holiday offering a unique opportunity for celebration and reflection. The remaining restricted holidays for 2024 include:

  • Birthday of Guru Rabindranath Tagore: Celebrated on May 8th, honoring the birth anniversary of the Nobel laureate.

  • Rath Yatra: Observed on July 7th, marking the chariot procession of Lord Jagannath.

  • Parsi New Year’s Day/Nauraj: Celebrated on August 15th, marking the New Year in the Parsi community.

  • Raksha Bandhan: Observed on August 19th, celebrating the bond between brothers and sisters.

  • Ganesh Chaturthi / Vinayaka Chaturthi: Celebrated on September 7th, honoring the birth of Lord Ganesha.

  • Onam or Thiru Onam Day: Observed on September 15th, marking the harvest festival in Kerala.

  • Dusshera (Saptami): Celebrated on October 10th, marking the victory of Lord Rama over Ravana.

  • Dussehra (Mahashtami) / Dussehra (Mahanavmi): Observed on October 11th, culminating in the victory of good over evil.

  • Maharishi Valmiki’s Birthday: Celebrated on October 17th, honoring the birth anniversary of the author of the epic Ramayana.

  • Karaka Chaturthi (Karwa Chouth): Observed on October 20th, celebrating the bond between husband and wife.

  • Naraka Chaturdasi: Celebrated on October 31st, marking the victory of Lord Krishna over the demon Narakasura.

Embracing Diversity and Tradition

India's public holidays for 2024 reflect the nation's vibrant tapestry of cultures, religions, and traditions. As we continue our exploration, let's delve into the significance of the remaining restricted holidays:

  • Govardhan Puja: Celebrated on November 2nd, honoring Lord Krishna's triumph over Lord Indra.

  • Bhai Duj: Observed on November 3rd, celebrating the bond between brothers and sisters.

  • Pratihar Shashthi or Surya Shashthi (Chhat Puja): Celebrated on November 7th, dedicated to worshipping the sun god and seeking blessings for the well-being of family members.

  • Guru Teg Bahadur’s Martyrdom Day: Commemorated on November 24th, honoring the sacrifice of Guru Teg Bahadur, the ninth Sikh Guru.

  • Christmas Eve: Observed on December 24th, marking the eve of the birth of Jesus Christ.

Reflecting on the Significance

Each of these holidays holds profound cultural, religious, or historical significance for the people of India. They serve as occasions for reflection, celebration, and communal bonding, reinforcing the country's rich heritage and values.

Planning Ahead

As we look forward to the upcoming year, it's essential to plan ahead and make the most of these holidays. Whether it's spending time with family, participating in religious rituals, or engaging in cultural festivities, these occasions offer opportunities to reconnect with our roots and strengthen the bonds of community.

Conclusion: Celebrating Unity in Diversity

India's public holidays for 2024 exemplify the nation's ethos of unity in diversity. From Republic Day to Christmas Eve, each holiday symbolizes a unique aspect of India's cultural heritage and collective identity.

As we navigate the year ahead, let us embrace the spirit of inclusivity and celebration that defines India's public holidays. May these occasions serve as reminders of our shared values, aspirations, and aspirations as we continue to strive towards a brighter, more harmonious future.

Thank you for joining us on this journey through India's public holidays for 2024. We hope you found this exploration enriching and insightful. Wishing you a year filled with joy, prosperity, and meaningful connections as we celebrate the diversity of our nation's cultural tapestry.

FAQs 🤔

  • What is the difference between gazetted and restricted holidays in India?

Gazetted holidays are officially recognized by the government and observed nationwide, while restricted holidays are optional and allow individuals to commemorate events of personal or cultural significance at their discretion.

  • How are public holidays determined in India?

Public holidays in India are determined by both union and state laws, taking into account religious, cultural, and nationalistic significance. The list of holidays may vary from year to year and is published in the official gazette.

  • Can private companies in India choose not to observe public holidays?

While public holidays are typically observed by government offices and public institutions, private companies have the discretion to decide whether or not to observe these holidays. However, most private companies do observe major public holidays for the convenience of their employees.

  • Are public holidays in India consistent across all states?

While certain holidays, such as Republic Day and Independence Day, are observed nationwide, some holidays may vary from state to state based on regional traditions and cultural practices. However, gazetted holidays are generally consistent across the country.

  • How can I make the most of public holidays in India?

Public holidays provide opportunities for relaxation, celebration, and spending time with family and friends. You can make the most of these holidays by planning ahead, participating in cultural festivities, exploring local attractions, or simply taking a well-deserved break from work.


  • What is the difference between gazetted and restricted holidays in India?

Gazetted holidays are officially recognized by the government and observed nationwide, while restricted holidays are optional and allow individuals to commemorate events of personal or cultural significance at their discretion.

  • How are public holidays determined in India?

Public holidays in India are determined by both union and state laws, taking into account religious, cultural, and nationalistic significance. The list of holidays may vary from year to year and is published in the official gazette.

  • Can private companies in India choose not to observe public holidays?

While public holidays are typically observed by government offices and public institutions, private companies have the discretion to decide whether or not to observe these holidays. However, most private companies do observe major public holidays for the convenience of their employees.

  • Are public holidays in India consistent across all states?

While certain holidays, such as Republic Day and Independence Day, are observed nationwide, some holidays may vary from state to state based on regional traditions and cultural practices. However, gazetted holidays are generally consistent across the country.

  • How can I make the most of public holidays in India?

Public holidays provide opportunities for relaxation, celebration, and spending time with family and friends. You can make the most of these holidays by planning ahead, participating in cultural festivities, exploring local attractions, or simply taking a well-deserved break from work.


Download App

Explore More

Managing assets totalling over 1 crore+